Welcome Applicants

Frequently Asked Questions


Will I see a wide variety of diseases at JFK Hospital and the VAMC?

JFK Medical Center cares for a demographically and socially diverse group of patients from urban, suburban and rural locations. In both the ambulatory and inpatient areas, residents are exposed to a wide spectrum of clinical problems demonstrating everything from common diseases, to the rare and unusual. Patients range in age from adolescence to the elderly. On the inpatient side, teaching cases are selected from over 27,000 admissions a year. Many of the admissions to the residents’ teaching service come from our Emergency Department, the busiest in the area. Admissions from the Emergency Department are triaged to assure an appropriate learning experience.
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With all those admissions, won’t the residents be overworked?

We have designed the admission system to provide the ward teams with a steady manageable flow of admissions allowing discussion and answering of patient diagnosis and management questions. Our Hospitalist program cares for patients not admitted to the resident service, ensuring compliance with admission caps. As we have no overnight call, residents report to work each day after sleeping in their own beds. Our night float system assures that residents are able to leave the hospital at an appropriate time after a day of admissions.
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Are most of the patients admitted already pre-diagnosed?

No! That’s one of the major advantages of training at UMRC. The majority of admissions are initial presentations arriving de novo from the community. Residents have the opportunity and the challenge to evaluate patients without the bias of previous diagnostic labels.
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Is education a core mission of the hospitals?

The partnership of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, JFK Medical Center and the West Palm Beach VAMC is based on a commitment to excellence in patient care, education, and scholarship. To our knowledge this is the first de novo startup of a program this size and years of planning and faculty development preceded the first class in 2008. The Miller School of Medicine has recently announced a new M.D./M.P.H. These students will spend their third and fourth years on the Palm Beach County clinical campus. We are looking to begin our surgery residency program starting during the 2011-2012 academic year.
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What research opportunities are there at UMRC?

Our program requires each resident to complete a scholarly project during their training. We have a full time research director and enthusiastic faculty willing to mentor residents in research projects. Our research curriculum begins with an Evidence-based Medicine workshop, continues with introduction to statistics and basic study design. We have had over 20 resident publications in peer reviewed journals over the last two years.
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What if I want to practice in the South Florida area?

Palm Beach County full embraced the planning of local residency training as a source of primary care physicians, hospitalists, and subspecialists. The ratio of residency training positions to population in Florida is one of the lowest in the country creating a need for physicians in many areas of the state including south Florida. The University of Miami, JFK Medical Center, as well as the VAMC all can assist graduates interested in practice opportunities in the area.
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It sounds like I’ll be well trained for a job in general Internal Medicine, but what if I want to do a fellowship?

Residents graduating from our training program have entered a variety of fellowship positions. In addition to excellent training, the faculty and leadership of the Department of Medicine helps each resident to choose a career path from among many attractive alternatives. Our residents have been very successful in obtaining competitive fellowship positions across the country and here in South Florida. Take a look at this year’s graduates.
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What really makes UMRC different than other training programs?

In designing the curriculum and experiences for this program, the faculty and leadership were able to incorporate the latest in learning theory, educational design, and practical clinical rotations. We have achieved a balance of clinical volume, didactic and interactive conferences that prepare or residents for any future career. We pride ourselves on the flexibility to allow each resident to tailor their experience to develop the skills and knowledge that will carry them on to the next step in their careers. We look forward to continuing to build the program in the coming years including developing fellowship programs, but in the mean time our residents have had remarkable success in achieving their desires fellowships and job placement.
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